Movie Club Friday: Mystic Mountain

Mystic_Mountain_on_Vimeo

It is UTAH FRIDAY!!  While the rest of the skydiving world is heading east to go compete at the 2014 USPA Nationals at Skydive Chicago, the president of the Blue Skies Mag Movie Club is on her merry way to go play in the lovely blue skies of Utah with some friends. We have plotted course to Cloud 9 in Draper, Utah and will be taking lessons to get to know this paragliding thing a bit better.

And this is the perfect movie to kick off that new adventure.

Brought to us by Cade Palmer, “Mystic Mountain” is a beautiful film. It is a story of a climb up Volcán Atitlán by an international crew of 9 friends, and then the paraglider filght down.  It captures *that* feeling beautifully and leaves the viewer wanting nothing more than go out into nature and get under a wing. Very touching, in an inspiring way. Cheers to new adventures, new friends and amazing views. Go fly!

Music by Christian Beherenz and Afro Celt Sound System.

Have a new video to submit, or a link to an oldie-goldie?
Send them through email to Missy or via Facebook in the Blue Skies Mag Movie Club.

Infinity Rigs: Alternate Bridle Routing

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Kelly Farrington from Velocity Sports Equipment, makers of the Infinity rigs, posted up a note on dropzone.com in response to the discussion about alternative closing methods.  He kindly gave us permission to share that note here.

infinity3dlogoLGSince we’ve gotten multiple emails about this topic today, I’ll throw my response out here for any curious Infinity owners. 
While it is OK to route the bridle from the bottom of an Infinity container, one should be careful to ONLY route the bridle under the #2 flap, and OVER the #1 flap. Tucking the bridle under the #1 flap could lower the security of the main pin cover flap and introduce premature wear.

What interests me is that until about 6 years ago, I had never heard of this malfunction happening. I believe it has become more prominent due to skydivers wanting every part of their gear “tight and tidy”, including the bridle under the pin cover flap- tucking it in so tight and orienting the pin in such a manner that the bridle can start moving before the pin does, giving the bridle an opportunity to impale itself on the pin. 
Social media is also making it easier for people to share the information, possibly making a mountain out of the proverbial mole hill. I would hope that the free flow of information on the web is the main culprit here and that we’re not actually regressing with our knowledge of knowing how to pack properly

Any routing/stowing of the bridle should be done so that any movement of the pilot chute end of the bridle results in either the pin extracting, or more slack in the bridle between the tip of the pin and where the bridle enters the main container.

There you have it!

For more information, check out links with notes from other harness & container manufacturers:

  • Click here to view alternate closing sequence on the UPT Vector container
  • Click here to view an alternate closing sequence on Rigging Innovation containers.
  • Click here to view the bulletin from Parachute Systems for the Vortex container.

 

Rigging Innovations: alternate bridle routing

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Following our post from last week on a container lock thanks to a closing pin piercing a deployment bridle, Rigging Innovations published photos showing an alternate closing sequence on their Facebook page.

For those that do not care for Facebook, the good folks at Rigging Innovations granted us permission to republish these photos showing the closing sequence in the gallery below.

The rest of you can head right over to Facebook with questions or comments directly for RI!

Container Lock Compliments of Closing Pin Through Bridle

Close up

Sandy Grillet has been skydiving since roughly the days of the wooden parachute. As a matter of fact, he’s been jumping since some of you reading were in diapers! (looking at you, Nick Grillet!!)

This past weekend a wingsuiter jumping a Javelin container experienced a pilot chute in tow malfunction, as a result of his pin piercing through the bridle after he tossed the pilot chute. This locks the container up pretty solidly, so the next step was to go for the silver handle. The wingsuiter landed without an incident, thankfully. This prompted Sandy to write-up a little note to educate his fellow skydivers on an alternate method of closing containers, in order to prevent that from happening again.

Sandy was kind enough to allow us to share his note and photos with the readers of Blue Skies Mag (originally posted on his personal Facebook page).

This happened, over the weekend, to a wingsuiter on the West coast. 
The closing pin penetrated the bridle before it was extracted from the closing loop, resulting in a pilot-chute-in-tow-malfunction. This can happen to anyone who routes the bridle from the top but it is more likely in a wingsuit, due to having a lot of forward speed at bridle extension.
Everyone, please STOP routing the bridle from top to bottom over the pin. We don’t need to put Kevlar on our bridles or task the manufacturers to fix our packing problems. We simply need to use some common sense and critical thinking skills to evaluate our container closing technique and evolve ourselves out of 80′s and 90′s mentality.

Oh – and maybe 1000 jumps on one PC and bridle might be enough – don’t you think?

I’ve been trying to spread the word and slowly, but surely, I’m making headway – including the professional packers with whom I speak. The last two pictures are of my rigs showing how I’ve been routing my bridle for the past 15 years. It works on any container and with a little thought, regardless of pin/window configuration, you can make the window face up – allowing someone to pin check you without having to touch anything. If you have any reason to disagree please send me a PM and we will have a civil debate on the merits of this bridle routing method.

Please help me and others spread the word. It is my belief that – together – we can eliminate pilot-chute-in-tow-malfunctions caused by pierced bridles. 

Click on photos for a larger view. The 4 first photos are courtesy of Ed Pawlowski who met the wingsuiter in the landing area and snapped these (that container is a Javelin). The 5th and last is taken by Sandy himself, demonstrating on his personal container (Vector). 

This has been a known (albeit rare) occurrence across the disciplines – it is not something only wingsuiters have to worry about. The rigs pictured here are Vectors, but this has happened on other containers as well that utilize the same closing sequence.

More and more jumpers seem to be opting to close their containers the “new” way (which really isn’t new, this is how the Racer has always been closed). Here is a video from 2011 made by at the UPT  rigging loft, featuring Pablito closing a rig with a camera on his head. This gives a great vantage point and shows the entire closing process. If you are only interested in the pin/bridle business, skip on to the 3 minute mark. We spoke to tour rep Greg Rau to confirm that as far as UPT is concerned, this method is sanctioned and approved by the factory (instructional sheet from UPT).

We have reached out to other manufactures for their comments and input and will amend this post as we get feedback. If you have a rig made by a manufacturer we have not listed here and want to look into a closing sequence not detailed in the manual, contact the manufacturer to make sure by fixing one problem you don’t create another one!

Here another photo courtesy of Ari Perelman, showing the way he closes his Vector container (fresh from a trip to Arizona, how can you tell?!).

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Photo by Ari Perelman

 

9/7/2014 – Update:  Click here to view an alternate closing sequence on Rigging Innovation containers.
9/8/2014 – Update: Click here to view the bulletin from Parachute Systems for the Vortex container.
9/8/2014 – Update: Click here to view a note from Velocity Sports Equipment, for the Infinity container.

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